THE GREAT PHYSICIAN REHABILITATION FOUNDATION, INC. (GPREHAB)

S.L. Teves Subdivision, Calindagan, Dumaguete City, Oriental Negros
Ms. Analou L. Suan, Executive Director
Telephone: (035) 4228308
Telefax: (035) 2261887
Mob: +63 9197557664

The Great Physician Rehabilitation Foundation, Inc. (GPRehab) is an organization whose main purpose is to support Persons with Disabilities (PWD) in their struggle for inclusion in society.

It was started in Oroquieta City, Misamis Occidental, Philippines, by a group of physical therapists and occupational therapists, who saw the need for low cost, high quality rehabilitation services.

Opening Doors, a rehabilitation project for children and adults with disabilities, went on for four years without formal funding from any outside entity.



Open Doors was able to provide free services to more than a thousand clients during its four years of implementation, not to mention giving away about 180 assistive devices-used wheelchairs, walkers, crutches from Norway-courtesy of its partner, the Norwegian Disabled Care Foundation (NDCF), a Norwegian volunteer NGO.

To learn more of our many projects and about our organisation
please visit our primary website at this link

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In The News

14 Jan 2010 - ABV Perpectives Article
( a correction to the above artcle)

Below: An article written by Gary Evans, ABV volunteer,
June 2010

On a bright Friday morning in a quiet Dumaguete suburb the sign on the gate said Great Physician Rehabilitation Foundation. Past the gate children played football on a patch of grass while others painted under the shade of a wild Mangosteen tree.

The soccer players were young boys with Downs’ Syndrome, Autism or deaf; many of the children painting were in wheel chairs or had difficulty walking. There were babies in arms.

Analou Suan one of the founders of ONCAN runs GP Rehab one of 25 non government organisations operating in Dumaguete.
The soccer game was boisterous and noisy while the painters concentrated on their creations.

These were papier mache models of boats, hats, houses and the obscure which they painted with the assistance of parents or the centre’s occupational therapists.

There were success stories sitting in the shade.

Gabriel was six and his mother held his paint pot.

“He came here and could not walk or communicate very well. With our help he is now able to attend grade one at a government school,” Analou said.

“Anthony is 13 and was spotted sitting in a house in a local village. The locals would not accept him because he was disabled.

“Lea is seven years old a lamp fell on her set her alight and she lost an arm. She was three months old.

“These are just two of our many success stories. With our help Anthony and Lea are both now attending grade one classes in government schools,” Analou said.

Many schools in the Philippines are not equipped to provide the special facilities needed by the handicapped or disabled but GP Rehab has addressed this issue.

With the help of Australian Business Volunteers 33 teachers have visited GP Rehab for special training to address problems for the handicapped or disabled. This training is now being utilised in many government schools.

“This is a start but clearly we need more teachers to be aware of the need for schooling of our special children,” Analou said.

The centre also has its own workshop which produces wheel chairs specially adapted to assist the handicapped.

Some have dividers in their seats to keep deformed legs apart; others are fitted with high trays to allow those with upper body disablements to use their arms and hands.

Like all charities GP Rehab depends on the generosity of people to continue its good work.

Donations should be sent to:

Executive Director,
GP REHAB,
S.L. Teves Subdivision,
Calindagan,
Dumaguete City,
Oriental Negros,
The Philippines.

 

The Great Physician

By Paolo Philippe Shaver 21 July 2010



In the city of Dumaguete, Philippines there stands a building tucked away in a small subdivision not so far from the busy center of town.

The Great Physician Rehabilitation Foundation is an organization whose purpose is to support differently-abled people in their struggle for inclusion in society.

They provide various services for children and youth with disabilities such as: special education, physical and occupational therapy, manufacture of wheelchairs and other assistive devices.

GPRehab has established a community based rehabilitation program to spread awareness and values for parents and families of disabled children and the community as a whole.
GPRehab started in Oroquieta City, Misamis Oriental, Philippines, by a group of therapists, in 1996.

It was initially called the Physical Therapy Unit of Famas Medical Clinic and after two years the clinic was moved to a rented house which had more space for the patients. At this time the center changed its name to The Great Physician Rehabilitation Center.

A year later,they moved to a hospital facility and later to Dumaguete City.

I had a chance to visit GPRehab recently and was able to talk to Ivy, a regular who works at the center and is a student at the Negros Oriental State University.

Ivy’s job is to provide assistance for the more senior members of the staff.

“I mainly provide assistance to two senior workers here when the children get out of control.
“I really feel a sense of fulfillment when I help the kids,” Ivy said.

One mother at the centre , Lili, spoke about her son, Sean, who has Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

Before they found GPRehab, Sean was very difficult to handle. He wouldn’t sit still in class; he couldn’t pay attention to his teachers.

After they went to GPrehab and Sean underwent personal one-on-one sessions with the foundation’s therapists he had become a calmer, better behaved boy.

Another mother, Baby Micompal told a tragic story of how her son, Gabriel, who was born 2 months premature suffered from Cerebral Palsy.

Baby is a single mother who came to Dumaguete from Manila without a peso in her pocket, pregnant and alone.

Hospitals were reluctant to accept her because of her situation but they took her in eventually.

Because of medical complications, Sean had to be delivered via c-section. Baby had no way of paying the hospital bills but with the seemingly impossible kindness of a stranger who offered to pay for dept to the hospital, Baby was able to start a new life with her child.

Gabriel is now studying in East City elementary school, although confined to a wheelchair given to him by GPRehab, he is a happy and eager young boy.

He is showing improvement in his motor skills thanks to the physical therapy sessions he receives, free of charge from GPRehab.

It’s amazing how many people have been helped by The Great Physician. If not for this wonderful organization it’s hard to imagine what the lives of these less fortunate children would have been. But thanks to them, children like Sean and Gabriel have a chance at happier life.

[Paolo Philippe Shaver is a Communications student at Silliman University]

 

Don’t Dislike the Unlike

By FLORENCE VI L. SANTOS


A woman with crutches on her left arm dashed towards the gate to on our arrival.
She was wearing shorts and sleeveless top showing only one arm.

She came to us hesitantly, maybe wondering who we are, with no footwear on. She let us enter and suddenly went inside because the phone rang. She was Ate Cherryl in her mid-thirties,and has been at Great Physician Rehabilitation Foundation Inc. (GPRehab) Dumaguete since it started in 2004.

GPRehab aims to support Persons with Disabilities (PWD) in their fight for inclusion in society. It was started in Oroquieta City, Misamis Occidental, Philippines, by a group of physical therapists and occupational therapists, who noticed the urgent need for low cost, high quality rehabilitation facility and services. In its sixth year of operation, GPRehab has served community based children and youth with disabilities and their parents.

With Norwegian Agency for Deveopment Cooperation (NORAD) as its sole funding source, it has extended its service to Dauin and Valencia, serving more PWDs. At present, they are giving free treatments to 134 beneficiaries with Down’s syndrome, autism, cerebral palsy, and mental retardation. There are only two physical therapists, three occupational therapists and three teachers to look after these people.

There is also a need for a doctor who will examine the condition of every child.
“Naay mga bata nga mokalit rag kisi kisi or di ba kaha mokalit rag bula ang baba. Ug naa mga bata nga sip.onon, ubhon, mao nga kinahanglan tag doctor,” Cherryl said.

In the center, children have limited supplies of toys and educational materials during classes. “Naay mga dulaan pero guntingon man sa mga bata. Dili mi makapalit dayon kay wala man mi kwarta,” she added.

In reality, persons are the objects of prejudices and discrimination. There is no day when they can’t be criticized.

Cherryl recalled the times when she was first brought by her mother to Dumaguete. Due to her physical state, the people started throwing coins to her, thinking she is begging . “Dili biya mi boang boang. Normal biya mi. Kung unsay ilang bation, mao pod among bation. Pero lisod,” says Ate Cherryl referring to the people who criticized her.

If only the government will give attention to persons with disabilities, then many other Cherryls out there would go out and proudly walk along the streets in the city, having the feeling of belongingness and free from discrimination.

Inequality is very much present in our society. It may be very hard for others to be thoughtful, sympathetic to these persons. It may be hard for some to accept those with disabilities. Analou Suan, Executive Director of GPRehab, said: “Acceptance does not only mean loving the child with a disability.

“It means recognizing his rights and believing fully in his ability to make changes in his own life, whether with a greater or lesser degree of support.

“ It means showing willingness to go the extra mile so that the very social structures that have presented obstacles to his participation in society can be eliminated.

“It means recognizing the fear of ridicule and discrimination, not as deterrents but rather as the driving force behind the desire for change.”

[Florence Santos is a Communication student at Silliman University. Dumaguete City. The Philippines.

 

 

To think of them too
By Kaiza Jay S. Abaincia
7/20/10

"The message I'll share...is that inclusion is extremely important for kids with and without disabilities." -- Clay Aiken

Cherryl, with her one leg and a crutch held by her left and only arm, opened the gate for us when we arrived at the Great Physician Rehabilitation Foundation Inc. (GPRehab) at S.L. Teves Subdivision Calindagan, Dumaguete City.

She guided us inside the gateway and excused herself for a moment when she heard the phone ring from the second floor of the two-storey home.

We followed to find out to where she was going. We were amazed of how quickly she moved and how efficient she was.

Cherryl is in her early thirties and has been GPRehab’s caretaker and utility in-charge since it started in Metro Dumaguete, Negros Oriental in 2004.

The organization originally was founded in Oroquieta Misamis Occidental, by a group of physical therapists and occupational therapists, who saw the need for low cost, high quality rehabilitation services in 2000.

Funded by the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (Norad) and Norwegian Disabled Care Foundation (NDCF), the main purpose of this project is to support Persons with Disabilities (PWD) in their struggle for inclusion in society.

At present there are 134 patients who are looked after at GPRehab Dumaguetemany with Down’s syndrome, Autism, and Mental Retardation.

Unfortunately teaching and help resources are scarce., There are only two physical therapists, three occupational therapists and three teachers who attend those at GPRehab.

There is also a need for a doctor to attend to the physical conditions of the children especially as most of their families have no money for regular check-ups.

The number for toys and educational materials for kids is limited too.

“Ang among mga gagmay bola, pangkit-kiton man, paakon, guntingon,” says ate Cherryl. (The small balls that we have, the kids nibble, bite and cut them).

GPRehab acknowledged the relevance of educating children with disabilities.

People with disabilities are one of the most vulnerable to prejudices and criticisms in society. Cherryl added that if the children were not educated, they would not be able to fight for their rights and demand a fairer environment.

Some children may be forced to hide from people who do not understand why they are disabled.

Cherryl recalles when her mother brought her to Dumaguete for the first time. When they stopped on street passersby started dropping coins at her feet.

This kind of indifference towards PWDs inspired GPRehab Executive Director Annalou Suan to walk the beneficiaries of the organization along in downtown areas where scenes like these are common.

In a blog post she said, “acceptance does not only mean loving the child with a disability. It means recognizing his rights and believing fully in his ability to make changes in his own life, whether with a greater or lesser degree of support.

“It means showing willingness to go the extra mile so that the very social structures that have presented obstacles to his participation in society can be eliminated.

“ It means recognizing the fear of ridicule and discrimination, not as deterrents but rather as the driving force behind the desire for change.”

The funding of the GPRehab is contractual and expires every three years. Cherryl’s chief plea is for the government to also look at the concerns of the disabled.

They are also part of our society.

[Kaiza Jay S Abainca is a Communications student at Silliman University]




 

 

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